Should I attend this court hearing?

Should I attend this court hearing?

Postby gjk235 » Tue May 24, 2011 2:24 pm

Hello all, hope you're well!

I have been following the loan debt template process, but the debt solicitors employed by the Bank were fairly dismissive of the whole process, and nothing I wrote to them seemed to deter them from pursuing me. Not even the invoice letter for in excess of £15 million for copyright infringement and fee schedule fees haha.

Anyhow, the situation is now that they have put a charge on the property via the Land Registry (the debt amount is abit over £8,000), and they say they are arranging a court hearing in mid-June to obtain an order to force us to sell the property to recoup the alleged debt. I've looked up the situation regarding these orders to force you to sell the property. So I've read, they're only rarely granted in extreme cases.

Would it be advisable to attend the hearing, and maybe attempt to claim common law jurisdiction?

Any thoughts would be appreciated.
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Re: Should I attend this court hearing?

Postby jonboy » Tue May 24, 2011 5:10 pm

If there is property involved, I would sign it over to someone trusted well in advance of the hearing.
"Reason is the life of the law; nay, the common law itself is nothing else but reason. The law which is perfection of reason" Sir Edward Coke 1552-1634.

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Re: Should I attend this court hearing?

Postby gjk235 » Tue May 24, 2011 5:36 pm

jonboy wrote:If there is property involved, I would sign it over to someone trusted well in advance of the hearing.


You mean a solicitor / lawyer?
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Re: Should I attend this court hearing?

Postby jonboy » Tue May 24, 2011 5:40 pm

You're kidding right?

"someone trusted" is MOST DEFINATELY NOT a solicitor! :clap:

I mean sign the deeds over to a family member or friend.

Solicitors and Lawyers work for the crown, their duty is to the crown, never to you. Getting "legal representation" makes you a "ward of the court"
Or in other words, an imbelcile, unable to administer your own affairs.

They cannot put a charge on a property you do not own.
"Reason is the life of the law; nay, the common law itself is nothing else but reason. The law which is perfection of reason" Sir Edward Coke 1552-1634.

NO ONE RULES IF NO ONE OBEYS.

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Re: Should I attend this court hearing?

Postby gjk235 » Tue May 24, 2011 5:42 pm

jonboy wrote:You're kidding right?

"someone trusted" is MOST DEFINATELY NOT a solicitor! :clap:

I mean sign the deeds over to a family member or friend.

Solicitors and Lawyers work for the crown, their duty is to the crown, never to you. Getting "legal representation" makes you a "ward of the court"
Or in other words, an imbelcile, unable to administer your own affairs.

They cannot put a charge on a property you do not own.


The charge has already been applied though, that is the problem. Too late?
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Re: Should I attend this court hearing?

Postby Dane » Tue Jun 14, 2011 12:41 am

A member of my family had a charge put on his house for 7k. At the time it seemed quite dramatic. But as far as Im aware it stops anyone else putting a charge on it. So in his case it kind of protects the house. Because when the people who are looking for 70k from him try to put a charge on they might be bemused.

I'm not sure what you can do if theres already a charge on your house. But if you ever want to transfer a property/land into someone elses name make sure that some money goes through as proof of sale and get a solicitor to act for you when regestering titles deeds etc, it will give the transaction more credibility. I believe a transaction can be revoked if say for example you claim you sold your mum your house for 10k and cant even prove any money shifted, let alone no solicitors were involved.

Just my tupps worth im going through a similar thing at the moment and i'm only pointing out my observations from dealing with this stuff. There are a lot better qualified people on here who may help.

Hope it all works out dude.

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